Medline: 9336136

International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics 39(3): 579-587, 1997.

Childhood optic chiasm gliomas: radiographic response following radiotherapy and long-term clinical outcome.

Tao ML, Barnes PD, Billett AL, et al.

Abstract:

Purpose:
In children with chiasmal gliomas, radiation therapy can arrest progressive visual and neurologic impairment. We examined the radiographic response and clinical outcomes after irradiation.

Methods:
AND MATERIALS: Forty-two children (median age at diagnosis, 6.6 years) with chiasmal gliomas were managed as follows: 11 asymptomatic patients with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1) were observed only; 2 patients, less than 3 years old, underwent surgery and chemotherapy to delay irradiation; and 29 patients with progressive disease received radiation with or without prior surgery or chemotherapy. Time to radiographic response, long-term tumor control and late sequelae were reviewed for the 29 irradiated patients.

Results:
The probability of at least 50% radiographic response at 24 months after irradiation was 18.1% and increased to 38.2% by 48 months and 45.9% by 60 months. By actuarial analysis, the median time for such radiographic response was 62 months. For the 29 irradiated patients, the 10-year freedom from progression and overall survival rates were 100% and 89%, respectively (median follow-up for surviving patients, 108 months). Stabilization or improvement in vision occurred in 81% of 26 evaluable irradiated patients.

Conclusions:
Notable radiographic response may be observed years after irradiation. Radiation therapy provides excellent long-term tumor control and vision preservation or improvement in the majority of patients with progressive chiasmal gliomas.


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